Roaring twenties

How did you introduce alcohol into your life? What were the challenges with your diabetes?  How did you ensure you wouldn’t experience any ‘issues’ while drinking? What were the challenges of moving away to college/university? Please share some tips and tricks about travelling and how T1D hasn’t stopped you from seeing the world.          

Preparation is everything when travelling. By covering all your bases you give yourself peace of mind and the ability to enjoy your trip without a worry! I always over-pack supplies, take a back-up insulin pump or pen, and research the local resources before travelling (What kind of insulin is available if I need it? Does it require a prescription? Am I staying near a hospital or doctor’s office?), etc.


~~ ​Anonymous ~~

My nurse had once told me that alcohol drops your blood sugar so when I began to drink I thought it made the most sense to mix something that dropped your sugar with something that raised it (orange juice, coke, etc.). That wasn’t the smartest idea because the sugary drinks would shoot my blood sugar up super high and it would take hours for the alcohol to kick in and drop it down (which it did). It took until I was 26 and starting the insulin pump training sessions for me to actually ask  how to balance drinking with my sugar levels. I wish I had spoken to my doctor or nurse, privately when I was younger so I could have understood what I needed to look for when beginning drinking instead of guessing. 


~~ ​Anonymous ~~

Since I have been diagnosed with T1D I have had some amazing travel experiences. I have backpacked Europe, spent a semester abroad in Israel, hiked around Australia’s red centre and lived in New Zealand for a year. The most important thing for me as a  person with T1D when I travel is to be prepared. I make sure I have almost twice as many supplies as I expect to need, a letter from my doctor and if I am doing any tours I make sure that I have told the tour operator that I  have T1D. When backpacking alone in Europe and travelling in Australia, I ensured I had enough snacks and  glucose tablets with me while I was traveling and I talked about being diabetic to the new friends I was travelling with so they understood what to do in case of emergency. I have a cool pack that I used to keep my insulin cool in cases where I wasn’t on a tour bus with a fridge. When hiking in a hot climate I err on the side of caution in terms of the amount of insulin I take because I know that exercise and heat can drop my blood sugar and I checked my blood sugar more than usual whenever that was possible.


~~ ​Anonymous ~~

I introduced alcohol into my life very gradually. I would have a beer or glass of wine with dinner and I saw how my blood sugars reacted to it. As I’ve gotten older and started going to parties in university, I choose to only go out and drink with certain friends; ones that know my diabetes well enough to know what to do in case there’s an issue. I also always bring  glucose tablets with me. Alcohol will make blood sugars go up, but it will also bring blood sugars down extremely quickly. Because of that, I always keep my sugars a bit higher than normal to avoid dangerous lows.  


~~ ​Anonymous ~~

I introduced alcohol with caution. I was well informed of the risks and I made sure that I was always in a situation where I had some food nearby in case of a low. I informed all of my close friends of the risks and they would always double check on me to make sure I was doing well.


~~ ​Anonymous ~~
Lets turn type one into type none